keytounknownlibraries: Book review - Frankenstein by Mary Shelley I am not sure what to say about this book, that hasn’t been said a million times before. I definitely enjoyed it a lot, there is a reason why this one is a classic. There’s so much human drama and character development happening, so much cruelty and horror – and yet you can relate to the characters. Both Frankenstein and the Creature go through phases where I felt for them and phases where I hated them. Though in the end, I think I feel much more for the Creature – if Frankenstein hadn’t fled and left it to learn on its own, things might have been a lot different. Or if he had stopped to think for a moment, before deciding to create something that looks unnatural and monstrous. The Creature is highly intelligent, as is shown by the speed in which it learns languages and understands human interactions. But due to its nature, it only experiences hatred and fear towards itself… no wonder it starts to act the same way.  Of course that is not an excuse to hurt and kill people, but we learn that the Creature feels remorse for that. Frankenstein on the other hand feels no remorse for the way he acts throughout the story – he only regrets that he has created the Creature at all. He does not seem to realize that all the violence from the Creature is just a reaction to what has happened to it and not the inherent nature of his creation. He thinks everything bad that has happened to the Creature is entirely justified and none of it is his fault. What else is there to say?  Well, read the book, of course, if you haven’t done so. Of course, yes, read the book. Read about a nuanced monster, which is the best kind of monster to have in your book. A.M.

keytounknownlibraries:

Book review - Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I am not sure what to say about this book, that hasn’t been said a million times before.

I definitely enjoyed it a lot, there is a reason why this one is a classic.

There’s so much human drama and character development happening, so much cruelty and horror – and yet you can relate to the characters. Both Frankenstein and the Creature go through phases where I felt for them and phases where I hated them. Though in the end, I think I feel much more for the Creature – if Frankenstein hadn’t fled and left it to learn on its own, things might have been a lot different. Or if he had stopped to think for a moment, before deciding to create something that looks unnatural and monstrous.

The Creature is highly intelligent, as is shown by the speed in which it learns languages and understands human interactions. But due to its nature, it only experiences hatred and fear towards itself… no wonder it starts to act the same way. 

Of course that is not an excuse to hurt and kill people, but we learn that the Creature feels remorse for that.

Frankenstein on the other hand feels no remorse for the way he acts throughout the story – he only regrets that he has created the Creature at all. He does not seem to realize that all the violence from the Creature is just a reaction to what has happened to it and not the inherent nature of his creation. He thinks everything bad that has happened to the Creature is entirely justified and none of it is his fault.

What else is there to say? 

Well, read the book, of course, if you haven’t done so.

Of course, yes, read the book. Read about a nuanced monster, which is the best kind of monster to have in your book.

A.M.